The sale of portable gas-powered generators has been banned from 2028 by a new California law

The sale of portable gas-powered generators has been banned from 2028 by a new California law

Certain types of generators will no longer be allowed to be sold by 2028, according to a new law passed by state lawmakers this month. California has become the first state in the nation to ban the sale of small gas-powered single-engine (SORE) off-road equipment such as lawn mowers and leaf blowers in an effort to reduce emissions. “Honestly, we’re going to have to figure out solutions for people,” said Ryan Howson, director of Holley Generator & Equipment at Rancho Cordova. “We hope to transform business in a way that we can support people in their time of need when the power goes out.” The new law affects portable gas powered generators with less than 25 horsepower. These types of generators can be used to power a refrigerator or other medium-sized appliances. Huson says he’s focused on making sure his customers have the strength and support they need, no matter what the product is. However, it has raised some concerns that many people, including wildfire survivors, may not be able to afford the transition to electricity. “I get on the environment and I want to reduce our emissions,” he said. “Expense and reliability. If everything was battery and electric, and I had no way to charge that back up, I wouldn’t have a reliable source of power.” Unlike gas-powered generators, which can be continually refueled during emergencies, the alternative requires charged batteries to conserve energy. “There is no comparison,” said Joseph Harding, technical director of the Portable Generator Manufacturers Association. “We don’t think zero-emissions portable generators are appropriate. Even in the event of a power outage, you can go to a gas station and get more gas.” KCRA 3 reached out to Assemblyman Marc Berman, who co-authored the bill with Assemblyman Lorena Gonzalez. “AB 1346 does not affect stationary generators, and does not phase out the sale of small portable gas-powered generators until 2028,” Berman wrote in a statement, “This extension is designed to provide sufficient time for manufacturers to develop cost-effective zero-portable generators that Meet consumer needs during outages. Regulators must first determine the technical feasibility and availability of portable zero-emission generators, and can adjust implementation schedules based on these factors.” Critics say they are not satisfied, and “The California Air Resources Board should not be ordering that this should be done in 2028, just hoping and praying the technology will be there,” Harding said.

Certain types of generators will no longer be allowed to be sold by 2028, according to a new law passed by state lawmakers this month.

California has become the first state in the nation to ban the sale of small gas-powered single-engine (SORE) off-road equipment such as lawn mowers and leaf blowers in an effort to reduce emissions.

“Frankly, we’re going to have to find solutions for people,” said Ryan Huson, director of Holley Generator & Equipment at Rancho Cordova. “We hope to transform business in a way that we can support people in their time of need when the power goes out.”

The new law affects portable gas powered generators with less than 25 horsepower. These types of generators can be used to power a refrigerator or other medium-sized appliances.

Huson says he’s focused on making sure his customers have the strength and support they need, no matter what the product is. However, it has raised some concerns that many people, including wildfire survivors, may not be able to afford the transition to electricity.

“I get on the environment and I want to reduce our emissions,” he said. “[The worry is] Expenses and reliability. If everything was battery and electric, and I had no way to charge that back up, I wouldn’t have a reliable source of power.”

Unlike gas-powered generators, which can be continually refueled during emergencies, the alternative requires charged batteries to conserve energy.

“There is no comparison,” said Joseph Harding, technical director of the Portable Generator Manufacturers Association. “We don’t think zero-emissions portable generators are appropriate. Even in the event of a power outage, you can go to a gas station and get more gas.”

KCRA 3 reached out to Assemblywoman Mark Berman, who co-authored the bill with Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez.

“AB 1346 does not affect stationary generators, and does not phase out the sale of small portable gas-powered generators until 2028,” Berman wrote in a statement, “This extension is designed to provide sufficient time for manufacturers to develop cost-effective zero-portable generators that Meet consumer needs during outages. Regulators must first determine the technical feasibility and availability of portable zero-emission generators, and can adjust implementation schedules based on these factors.”

Critics say they are not satisfied.

“The California Air Resources Board shouldn’t mandate this has to be done in 2028, just hoping and praying the technology will be there,” Harding said.

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